Category Archives: food for thought

Preventing your new dog from going AWOL

Strange title for a gardening blog entry, no?

Well, as you already know, my two biggest loves are gardening and dogs (well, there are three, but the third doesn’t apply here lol).  I don’t think I’m alone in that.  The companionship of a dog and a garden can be equally comforting and rewarding.  Over time we learn what makes our plants tick much the same way as we learn about our dogs — we spend time together, we watch, we make deals, we try different methods to get a desired outcome — they are both always a work in progress!

But today I want to talk about how to keep our new dogs safe.  It was prompted by the story of Yoghi, a young male Spinone Italiano — aka an Italian hunting dog — who went missing on October 20th in Ottawa, after having just arrived in Canada.  Despite two weeks of sightings and 24 hour searching, Yoghi was too fearful and would not be caught.  Just barely in advance of winter, he was found today and is now back home in the loving arms of his family.

Truth is, many dogs today are being adopted on foreign shores and then brought back to Canada to start their new lives.  The trip can be scary and disorienting, and it is not unusual for a “new Canadian” dog to bolt at some stage during the journey.  If it does get into the arms of it’s new owners without incident, it may still be what is known as a “flight risk” — that is, a dog who is easily spooked and must be handled with care and a tremendous amount of safeguards to ensure its security.

But it’s not just foreign dogs who can go AWOL – in truth, any dog who is changing hands can, as can any dog who is spooked by something sudden.  Even a dog who has been with you for years can suddenly disappear.  So that is why I’ve decided to write about strategies you can use to ensure your dog’s safety.

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Our newest dog Scout was a two year old first-time mom when she was abandoned at the vets by her previous owners.  She was so scared and confused when she landed at the Humane Society that she needed medication to calm her fears.

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Scout is a mixed breed with 1/4 border collie DNA and is the most cuddly and food-motivated dog I’ve ever had the pleasure of knowing.  However, these character traits weren’t fully obvious at first.  I understand that it takes anywhere from 3 to 6 months for a “new” dog to show its true colours.  And more than this, it takes an uncertain amount of time for a “new” dog to bond with its new family.

A few months after we adopted her, Scout pushed open our front screen door, ran past my husband, mouth gaping, on the front porch and down the street.

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SOMEONE’S HAVING A BLAST!

We ran! We called! She stopped, looked at us and kept running in the opposite direction.  Thankfully she ran “right” instead of “left” at the bottom of our front steps, a decision which meant we intercepted her in a neighbour’s backyard rather than as a crumbled, lifeless heap in the middle of a very busy four lane thoroughfare.

Truth is, making sure a “new” dog is safe is a multi-pronged endeavour but can mean the difference between life and death.  After Scout’s brief adventure, we made sure we put several safety protocols into play so that she would never be at risk again.  I share several of them with you here, as well as others that might be useful to you.

1.SECURE THE FRONT DOOR WITH GATES:

After Scout’s getaway, we realized our front door was not secure.  So I searched online and in local pet stores for a gate that would be appropriate.  Our front door didn’t seem to be “standard”, so many options were simply too big or too small.   I didn’t want the type of gate that simply pressed against the door jamb; in my experience, these gates could be pushed out of place.  Nor did I want a gate that was too short, as Scout would surely jump over it.  I also wanted a gate that could be opened and closed fairly easily for humans, but be more difficult for a dog to do the same — even a border collie!  I opted for one that was secured into a bracket that had to be screwed into the jamb.  There was a mechanism on top of the gate that allowed it to be opened inwards, meaning it didn’t interfere with the screen door on the other side.  This is a version of the gate that we chose.

Then I realized we also needed a barrier for the front porch, as we often sit out there in good weather.  The top of our stairs didn’t seem to allow for a built-in wooden gate, so we found something that was sturdy, tall and relatively attractive online: this one is it.

Here are the two gates pictured together…Fort Knox!

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Of course I won’t tell you that the opening mechanism on the inside gate kept getting harder and harder to release so I kicked it (really hard) one day and voila, it’s so much easier to operate now <wink>

2.CAR STRATEGIES TO PREVENT BOLTING:

I quickly realized that I could not take Scout in and out of our car through the back hatch.  When I lifted it, the opening it created was too large for me to block with my body in case she decided to leap out.

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NOT THIS WAY!

This was before I had had a chance to teach her manners, so I had to think of another solution.  I decided to take her in and out from the back seat, even though it meant putting the car barrier between the front and back seats, rendering my vehicle a paddy wagon for whenever my poor parents had to ride with me….

The barrier was necessary because she really wanted to ride in the front seat, ideally with her feet on the dash and her nose pressed closed to the windshield.  This riding-in-the-car thing was new to her and she was fascinated by it!

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THIS WAY!

There are plenty of seat covers that work in the back of all cars to keep the seats clean.  This is by far a better solution with a dog who may jump out of the car without warning.

The other precaution is either using dog seat belts or tethering the dog inside the car with a leash.  Both of these strategies work best with the dog situated in the back seat.

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This seatbelt is available through iheartdogs:  https://iheartdogs.com/product/heavy-duty-adjustable-dog-seat-beltdog-safety-belt/

3.WALKING PROTOCOL: LEASHES, COLLARS, HARNESSES:

It is important, even with the most reliable and predictable dog, to ensure that you have control over him/her while you’re out and about walking.  Using a collar or harness that they can’t break away from is paramount.

A regular collar with a clip-on leash is totally unreliable: firstly, if the dog pulls or lunges or bolts, either the collar will potentially injure the dog’s larynx OR it will slip right off allowing him/her to get free.

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Sophia Yin gives a good analysis of all collar/harness types from the point of view of medical safety in this blog post here.  She favours the use of front clip harnesses and head halters.  Surprisingly, savvy or insistent dogs can actually rid themselves of a harness, as can be seen in this video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tKNAw3r2F2g) so never leave a dog unattended while secured using a harness.

Choke chains, prong collars and regular collars are not safe choices unless your dog is very well trained already (some trainers believe the first two choices are not good ones under any circumstance).  Martingale collars, which operate under the same principle, that is, tightening as the dog pulls, are a superior choice because of their wider profile and regulated tightening capability.

Whatever you choose, make sure it a) is safe for the dog’s neck and body, and b) doesn’t allow them to escape easily.

Some dog owners fasten their dog’s leash to their waist, so that they don’t have to rely on their hands to keep the leash secure and that their whole body acts as a means to stop their dog from getting loose from a bolt or lunge at full speed.  Ruffwear has a great selection of dual purpose hand-held and waist-attached leashes here.

 

This video shows Scout waiting for her Dad to come out of the washroom at Upper Canada Village wearing her Ruffwear harness, embroidered collar with phone number and leash attached at the chest.  You’d think I was torturing her!

Whatever you do, do NOT rely on flexi-leashes to secure your dog.  If he/she bolts, even if this leash is attached to a well-made, super secure, front-clip harness (some of the best are also found through Ruffwear here), by the time your dog runs to the end of the flexi-leash’s tether, it will fly out of your hand so fast (perhaps even injuring you in the process) that your dog will be free, dragging the flexi-leash behind him!

4.TRAINING:

Over time with a new dog, being a very judicious trainer will ensure that he/she will have a more predictable behaviour in unpredictable situations.

One of the first things you should teach is “wait” — wait before leaving the house, so that you can lead the way, rather than being pulled out the door and down the stairs.  And wait before exiting the car until you have given the say-so.  This command alone may save your dog’s life.  The other command, in my opinion, equally important to “wait” is a recall.  A solid recall is something that you’ll need to practice every day of your dog’s life.

Loose-leash walking is also something that all dogs need to learn.  It makes walking together a pleasure instead of a chore and in the end, will save your shoulder sockets and back!

5.WHAT TO DO IF YOUR DOG DOES GET AWAY FROM YOU:

a) Don’t panic!

b) Don’t chase!

c) Use your recall word…if that doesn’t work, try yelling “Puppy, puppy, puppy!”;

d) Run in the opposite direction;

e) Drop to the ground and make high pitched, happy noises;

f) Use treats to get the dog to come closer;

g) Secure the dog with a leash slowly and carefully – no sudden lunges or movements.

There is an excellent blog post on how to navigate what can be a very stress first few moments of a loose dog; you can find it here.

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If your dog does not respond to these actions and keeps running or disappears from sight, then immediately take action.  Petfinder has a great resource in this article to help you take the appropriate steps when your dog is lost: find it here.  The more people you can reach about your lost dog, the better.  It often takes a village to return a dog to it’s owner.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gardens change…

Life changes.  Gardens change.

Some of this is planned, orchestrated, made better.  Other times changes are borne out of circumstance that don’t necessarily fit into your idea of aesthetics.

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Some time ago we placed mattresses on our living room floor so that our beloved Skye-dog would not be alone at night.  You see, she can no longer negotiate our stairs and we didn’t want her to be relegated to the downstairs without us.  So we all sleep in the living room together.  She will be 14 this month and is a 5+ year lymphoma survivor.

For some, this would be anathema.  For us, it is togetherness and there is a certain simplicity to it.

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The living room is one thing.  The garden is another.

As anyone with an aging dog knows, we must tweak how we live to accommodate them.  This may mean mobility aids, raised dishes, night lights, shortened walks, regular vet visits, ramps and modified outings.

Our backyard was never doggie friendly.  Years ago, when our beloved best friend was Riley, one day she exited the kitchen door to the backyard and leaped off the porch stairs — much like she had all her life — but this time to touch down in agony on the ground.  Her anterior cruciate ligament was ruptured and she would need surgery to repair it.  In Skye’s case, she could no longer negotiate the steep stairs and a solution for nightly potty breaks had to be figured out.

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That’s when my wonderful friend Jo Hodgson stepped in last fall and built in one day our doggie ramp…which was a god-send to us throughout the winter of 2015-16 — a winter that was not supposed to be seen by Skye-dog at all…

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But the garden!  The garden!

It is a work in progress.  And always will be … as circumstances change.

What is a garden worth?  Does it exist without love?  Without associations?

This garden will forever reflect this relationship.

I wouldn’t have it any other way.

 

Goldenrod shouldn’t be roasted and eaten with Thanksgiving dinner

Poor parsnip.  All it wants to do is be eaten.  And it should be!  It is loaded with nutrients, vitamins and cancer-fighting anti-oxidants….but its toxic sap just keeps grabbing all the headlines.

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But wait a minute?  What’s this?  The only other yellow plant more maligned than wild parsnip is the ubiquitous goldenrod, Solidago canadensis.  Believed to be the wild botanical culprit that causes our autumn sniffles and itchy eyes — but isn’t! that credit goes to ragweed — goldenrod is actually cultivated in Europe as an ornamental and used in decorative plantings alongside ornamentals (like grasses, sedum, Joe Pye weed as well as rudbeckias, asters and echinacea.)

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Best to know the difference between the two — wild parsnip, as well as its relatives giant hogweed (uber toxic sap), dill, coriander, carrot, parsley, Queen Anne’s lace, and others — are members of the Apiaceae (formerly Umbelliferae) family.  They share the same flower-structure, which appears as a flat-topped umbel:

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So be aware, but don’t be fearful.

After all, parsnips are yummy with your Thanksgiving dinner!  Goldenrod, not so much.

Earth Day 2014 and a challenge….

In honour of Earth Day, especially when this day in 2014 is grey and wet and there is little colour yet to be seen, I give you hope but I also give you a challenge….

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How are you celebrating?  Have you gone searching for the earliest spring blooming perennials in your garden?

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Did you skip your clean-up last fall and are you having now to unearth blooms from under a blanket of wet leaves?

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Are you seeing these beauties in other peoples’ gardens?  Are you now making plans for this autumn, searching for Chionodoxa, primrose and other jewels to enjoy in your own space next spring?

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This spring, I challenge you to not simply look down and appreciate the plants.  I challenge you to take a garbage bag with you on your next walk and pick up plastic, pop cans, other peoples’ trash — there is nothing that makes a landscape more unhappy and feel more unloved.   And if this blight is on your regular commute, you see it everyday and it chisels away part of your soul and your feelings of hope for the future.   Make the world, your small piece of the world, a place that can bring joy instead of discouragement.  Honour a small part of your world and clean it up.  Do it in honour of Earth Day…

But do more than this:  tell me about it!  Take “before” and “after” photos and I’ll post them — and give you kudos for a job well done.

 

Random thoughts: a wretched winter, ‘holiday’ and faith

 

 

It is crazy sometimes how there is so much beauty in such menace.

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The papery sheaths of dog-strangling vine seedpods and their delicate twisting stems strike such a beautiful silhouette against the snow.

But, honestly, it is not even mid-January and the crusty, icy and treacherous trails that Skye and I walk are not fit for human or beast.

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A youthful dog might prance and pounce through this awful mess of a winter, but it is slow going if you’re 11 1/2.  And a dog, that is.

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It is now well past Twelfth Night and we are finally taking down the Christmas tree.  It is funny how Christmas is now a ‘dirty’ word.  When I was in retail, there was little mention of it, only the ‘holidays’.  I remember as a young girl, being sent on my way after a night of baby-sitting at a neighbour’s house.  I said politely upon leaving, “Merry Christmas”, only to hear in reply that they didn’t celebrate Christmas.   Didn’t celebrate Christmas?  How can that be?  Didn’t everyone celebrate Christmas?

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Apparently not if you’re a devout Jew is what I learnt.  And I also learnt much later, as I was a well-insulated WASP child, that Christianity and Judaism aren’t the only faiths.

Out recently with an old (Jewish) friend I said, ‘Really, what makes us so different in terms of faith?’ — that is, if I were a true Christian.  She replied with a laugh, ‘Jesus’.

I have always been curious about my inherited, if not embraced, faith in a historical sense, as well as the figures that take centre stage in it.  In my case, Jesus, his followers as well as those who are said to have written the New Testament.   Did they really exist as we think they did?  How true are the ‘Jesus stories’?  What is symbol and what is historical truth?

It is interesting to me how history has unfolded largely within the rigid structure of religion — with the skills needed for learning and self-awareness not shared beyond the monastery wall.   I thought of that when we visited several plantations on our trip through the southern states two years ago.  The haves and the have-nots.

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Reflection

The Christmas season is upon us and I have noticed that everyone is distracted.  People seem to be driving around town wrapped in a fog of multi-tasking, walking in and out of stores with a grim determination rather than a smile.

Excuse me while I slow down the pace a little bit.

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It is such a beautiful time of year, especially with this layer of healing snow.  As gardeners, it allows us the opportunity to rest and reflect.

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 If you can, take a moment to think about your year.  What were the highlights?  Here are some of mine…

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First, and perhaps most importantly for me, celebrating another year with my beloved Skye-dog.  As many of you know, she was diagnosed with lymphoma when she was 8 1/2 years old back in February 2011.  After undergoing six months of chemotherapy and complementary holistic care, the first with Dr. Bravo and her team at Alta Vista Animal Hospital and the second with Dr. Eddie Beltran at Blair Animal Hospital, Skye-dog remains healthy and in remission.  We are very grateful and hope that she stays with us for another lifetime.  Surely not too much to ask.

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My trip to Francis Cabot’s garden known as Les Quatres Vents with my friend Patti was a bit of a marathon, in a good way.  A long drive and much anticipation ended in several hours of horticultural wonder, not to mention post-viewing garden analysis.

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If that wasn’t enough of a feast for the eyes, I saw the spectacular glass creations of Dale Chihuly at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, which were just so alive and organic.

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My year was also filled with smaller, but no less meaningful moments…

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Slow down, take a breath.  What have your moments been?

Random (somewhat maudlin) November thoughts

The temperature and light is shifting.  Strange winds blow and the grass starts to form weird wavy patterns as it begins to recline after a long summer.

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Animals slow down and think about finding a place to call home before the snow arrives.

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Our walks are faster and colder.  I’m often forgetting to wear anything on my hands but I have placed a wool blanket on the back seat of the car so Skye will not be chilled.

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We are stockpiling coffee logs for the fireplace.  Real wood snaps and crackles, making Skye run and hide.

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Gardens are being cut down, tidied up and let sleep for the winter.  Colds and sore throats are beginning to impact our state of mind.

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Melancholy is beginning to set in.

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Short days, cold nights.  Bundle up.  I’ll put on my happy hat next time ;c)